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Coding Theorems of Classical and Quantum Information Theory: Second Edition
K. R. Parthasarathy, Indian Statistical Institute, New Delhi, India
A publication of Hindustan Book Agency.
cover
Hindustan Book Agency
2013; 186 pp; hardcover
ISBN-13: 978-93-80250-41-0
List Price: US$48
Member Price: US$38.40
Order Code: HIN/59
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The aim of this little book is to convey three principal developments in the evolution of modern information theory: Shannon's initiation of a revolution in 1948 by his interpretation of the Boltzmann entropy as a measure of information yielded by an elementary statistical experiment and basic coding theorems on storage and optimal transmission of messages through noisy communication channels; the influence of ergodic theory in the enlargement of the scope of Shannon's theorems through the works of McMillan, Feinstein, Wolfowitz, Breiman, and others, and its impact on the appearance of the Kolmogorov-Sinai invariant for elementary dynamical systems; and finally, the more recent work of Schumacher, Holevo, Winter, and others on the role of von Neumann entropy in the quantum avatar of the basic coding theorems when messages are encoded as quantum states, transmitted through noisy quantum channels and retrieved by generalized measurements.

This revised second edition has a chapter devoted to quantum error correction theory that shows how information in the form of quantum states can be made to tunnel through a noisy environment.

A publication of Hindustan Book Agency; distributed within the Americas by the American Mathematical Society. Maximum discount of 20% for all commercial channels.

Readership

Graduate students and research mathematicians interested in modern information theory.

Table of Contents

  • Entropy of elementary information
  • Stationary information sources
  • Communication in the presence of noise
  • Quantum coding
  • Quantum error correction
  • Bibliography
  • Index
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