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Interconnection Networks and Mapping and Scheduling Parallel Computations
Edited by: D. Frank Hsu, Arnold L. Rosenberg, and Dominique Sotteau
A co-publication of the AMS and DIMACS.
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DIMACS: Series in Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science
1995; 342 pp; hardcover
Volume: 21
ISBN-10: 0-8218-0238-0
ISBN-13: 978-0-8218-0238-0
List Price: US$91
Member Price: US$72.80
Order Code: DIMACS/21
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The interconnection network is one of the most basic components of a massively parallel computer system. Such systems consist of hundreds or thousands of processors interconnected to work cooperatively on computations. One of the central problems in parallel computing is the task of mapping a collection of processes onto the processors and routing network of a parallel machine. Once this mapping is done, it is critical to schedule computations within and communication among processors so that the necessary inputs for a process are available where and when the process is scheduled to be computed. This book contains the refereed proceedings of a DIMACS Workshop on Massively Parallel Computation, held in February 1994. The workshop brought together researchers from universities and laboratories, as well as practitioners involved in the design, implementation, and application of massively parallel systems. Focusing on interconnection networks of parallel architectures of today and of the near future, the book includes topics such as network topologies, network properties, message routing, network embeddings, network emulation, mappings, and efficient scheduling.

Co-published with the Center for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science beginning with Volume 8. Volumes 1-7 were co-published with the Association for Computer Machinery (ACM).

Readership

Computer scientists and research mathematicians.

Table of Contents

  • F. S. Annexstein -- Ranking algorithms for Hamiltonian paths in hypercubic networks
  • J.-C. Bermond, J. Bond, and S. Djelloul -- Dense bus networks of diameter \(2\)
  • P. Berthomé and A. Ferreira -- On broadcasting schemes in restricted optical passive star systems
  • W. Y. C. Chen, V. Faber, and E. Knill -- Restricted routing and wide diameter of the cycle prefix network
  • G. Cooperman and L. Finkelstein -- Permutation routing via Cayley graphs with an example for bus interconnection networks
  • R. Diekmann, B. Monien, and R. Preis -- Using helpful sets to improve graph bisections
  • D.-Z. Du, D. F. Hsu, and D. J. Kleitman -- Modification of consecutive-\(d\) digraphs
  • J. Duato and P. López -- Highly adaptive wormhole routing algorithms for \(N\)-dimensional torus
  • D. G. Erickson and C. J. Colbourn -- Conflict-free access to constant-perimeter rectangular subarrays
  • L. Finta and Z. Liu -- Makespan minimization of task graphs with random task running times
  • A. Gerasoulis, J. Jiao, and T. Yang -- Scheduling of structured and unstructured computation
  • L. A. Goldberg -- Routing in optical networks: The problem of contention
  • M. Hamdi -- Communications in optically interconnected parallel computer systems
  • R. Harbane -- Fault-tolerant Kautz networks
  • C. Jesshope and I. Nedelchev -- Asynchronous packet routers
  • X. Jia -- Cayley digraphs of finite cyclic groups with minimal average distance
  • O. H. Karam and D. P. Agrawal -- Shuffled tree based fault-tolerant hierarchical interconnection networks
  • L. Qiao and Z. Yi -- Restricted connectivity and restricted fault diameter of some interconnection networks
  • S. Rajasekaran -- Sorting and selection on interconnection networks
  • S. W. Song -- Towards a simple construction method for Hamiltonian decomposition of the hypercube
  • S. G. Ziavras -- Generalized reduced hypercube interconnection networks for massively parallel computers
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