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Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
ISSN 1088-9485(online) ISSN 0273-0979(print)

Perspectives on American mathematics


Author: Karen Hunger Parshall
Journal: Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 37 (2000), 381-405
MSC (2000): Primary 01A55, 01A60
Published electronically: June 26, 2000
MathSciNet review: 1779411
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Abstract:

A research-level community of mathematicians developed in the United States in the closing quarter of the nineteenth century. Since that time, American mathematicians have regularly paused to assess the state of their community and to reflect on its mathematical output. This paper analyzes a series of such reflections--beginning with Simon Newcomb's thoughts on the state of the exact sciences in America in 1874 and culminating with the 1988 commentaries on the ``problems of mathematics" discussed at Princeton's bicentennial celebrations in 1946--against a backdrop of broader historical trends.


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Additional Information

Karen Hunger Parshall
Affiliation: Departments of History and Mathematics, University of Virginia, Kerchof Hall, Charlottesville, VA 22903-3199
Email: khp3k@virginia.edu

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/S0273-0979-00-00873-9
PII: S 0273-0979(00)00873-9
Received by editor(s): January 28, 2000
Received by editor(s) in revised form: February 21, 2000
Published electronically: June 26, 2000
Additional Notes: An abbreviated version of this paper was presented as an MAA plenary address at the joint meetings of the AMS, MAA, and SIAM in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, 20 January 2000. I would like to thank those who offered comments and suggestions on the content of the talk.
Article copyright: © Copyright 2000 American Mathematical Society