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Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society
Proceedings of the American Mathematical Society
ISSN 1088-6826(online) ISSN 0002-9939(print)

 

Geometric criteria for the nonexistence of cycles in Gause-type predator-prey systems


Author: Yaping Liu
Journal: Proc. Amer. Math. Soc. 133 (2005), 3619-3626
MSC (2000): Primary 34D23; Secondary 34C07, 92D25
Published electronically: June 8, 2005
MathSciNet review: 2163598
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Abstract: The global stability of a multi-species interacting system has apparently important biological implications. In this paper we study the global stability of Gause-type predator-prey models by providing new criteria for the nonexistence of cycles and limit cycles. Our criteria have clear geometrical interpretations and are easier to apply than other methods employed in recent studies. Using these criteria and related techniques we are able to develop new results on the existence and uniqueness of cycles in Gause-type models with various growth and response functions.


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Additional Information

Yaping Liu
Affiliation: Department of Mathematics, Pittsburg State University, Pittsburg, Kansas 66762
Email: yliu@pittstate.edu

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/S0002-9939-05-08026-3
PII: S 0002-9939(05)08026-3
Keywords: Geometric criterion, global stability, limit cycle, predator-prey system, Dulac's theorem, Li\'{e}nard system.
Received by editor(s): August 13, 2004
Published electronically: June 8, 2005
Communicated by: Carmen C. Chicone
Article copyright: © Copyright 2005 American Mathematical Society
The copyright for this article reverts to public domain 28 years after publication.