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Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

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Home > 2010 Mathematical Art Exhibition
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"Ribbons of Rhythm," by Paul Stacy (Landscape Architect, Sydney, Australia)

Giclee digital print, 22" x 14" , 2009. Ribbons of Rhythm (foreground image with detail behind) is an exploration of the aesthetic qualities of Penrose tiling. David Austin in "Penrose Tilings Tied up in Ribbons", describes the ribbons thus: "Opposite sides of a rhomb are parallel to one another. Therefore, if we begin with a rhomb and a pair of opposite sides, we may form a "ribbon" by adding the rhombs attached to that pair of opposite sides and then continuing outward". The print reveals only a single family of parallel ribbons in one orientation, however there are another four orientations associated with a five-fold Penrose tiling. "Without a programming or mathematical background, I explore my interest in Penrose tiles by hand building patterns in Corel Draw and experimenting with colors, shapes, welding, contouring and other functions that allow me to explore the aesthetic realm of Penrose tiling, which continues to hold my interest particularly as long range positional order and beauty are revealed." --- Paul Stacy (Landscape Architect, Sydney, Australia) www.pdstacy.com

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