Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius ands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

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Home > 2010 Mathematical Art Exhibition
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"It's Not That Simple, I," by Gary R. Greenfield (University of Richmond, VA)

Digital Print, 10" x 10", unframed, 2009. This op art sequence shows visualizations from a simulation based on cellular morphogenesis. Concentrations of three of four cell transcription factors are interpreted as RGB values. These cell substances diffuse, interact, and express and inhibit the genes within cells that are responsible for producing such substances. Here there are two types of cells and the image was captured after the gene activation equation had been evaluated 400 times. "Many of my computer generated algorithmic art works are based on simulations that are inspired by mathematical models of physical and biological processes. In exploring the space of parameters that govern the simulation, I try to focus the viewer's attention on the complexity underlying such processes." --- Gary R. Greenfield (University of Richmond, VA)

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