Publications Meetings The Profession Membership Programs Math Samplings Policy & Advocacy In the News About the AMS

 



Math ImageryThe connection between mathematics and art goes back thousands of years. Mathematics has been used in the design of Gothic cathedrals, Rose windows, oriental rugs, mosaics and tilings. Geometric forms were fundamental to the cubists and many abstract expressionists, and award-winning sculptors have used topology as the basis for their pieces. Dutch artist M.C. Escher represented infinity, Möbius bands, tessellations, deformations, reflections, Platonic solids, spirals, symmetry, and the hyperbolic plane in his works.

Mathematicians and artists continue to create stunning works in all media and to explore the visualization of mathematics--origami, computer-generated landscapes, tesselations, fractals, anamorphic art, and more.

Jump to one of the galleries

Share this page




Share this


Explore the world of mathematics and art, share an e-postcard, and bookmark this page to see new featured works..

Home > 2012 Mathematical Art Exhibition
Click to view full size image

"Pleated Multi-sliced Cone," by Thomas Hull (Western New England University, Springfield, MA), Robert Lang (Robert J. Lang Origami) and Ray Schamp (Ray's Origami)

16" x 16" x 5", elephant hide paper, 2011
Second Place Award, 2012 Mathematical Art Exhibition

Imagine a long paper cone that is pleated with alternating mountain and valley creases so that its cross-section is star-shaped. Now slice the cone with a plane and imagine reflecting the top part of the cone through this plane. The result is exactly what one would get if we folded the pleated cone along creases made by the intersecting plane. Doing this repeatedly can result in interesting shapes, including the origami version presented here. This work is a collaboration. The concept and crease pattern for this work was devised and modeled in Mathematica by origami artist Robert Lang (http://www.langorigami.com/). The crease pattern was then printed onto elephant hide paper by artist Ray Schamp (http://fold.oclock.am/). The paper was then folded along the crease pattern by mathematician and origami artist Thomas Hull (http://mars.wne.edu/~thull). Part of the charm of paper folding is its capacity for simple, elegant beauty as well as stunning complexity, all within the same set of constraints. This mirrors the appeal of mathematics quite well. Geometric origami, which is where most of my artwork lives, strives to express in physical form the inherent beauty of mathematical concepts in geometry, algebra, and combinatorics. The constraints that origami provides (only folding, no cutting, and either one sheet of paper or further constraints if more than one sheet is allowed) challenges the artist in a way similar to being challenged be a mathematical problem. --- Thomas Hull (Western New England University, Springfield, MA, http://mars.wne.edu/~thull)

kepner-brokendishes-12.jpg kallweit-sphere-12.jpg hull-lang-schamp-12.jpg hermann-colorwheel-12.jpg hart-4sierpinskis-12.jpg