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Home > Knots

symmetry3.jpg
symmetry3.jpg"Symmetry Energy Image III," by Rob Scharein (Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics, Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada)

This example illustrates the SE rendering mode in KnotPlot, which visualizes the symmetric energy distribution. KnotPlot is a program to visualize and manipulate mathematical knots in three and four dimensions, and the website includes a wealth of resources and pictures. This picture is a direct screen capture from KnotPlot, rendered entirely in OpenGL, an environment for portable, interactive graphics applications.

--- Rob Scharein
symmetry2.jpg
symmetry2.jpg"Symmetry Energy Image II," by Rob Scharein (Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics, Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada)

This example illustrates the SE rendering mode in KnotPlot, which visualizes the symmetric energy distribution. KnotPlot is a program to visualize and manipulate mathematical knots in three and four dimensions, and the website includes a wealth of resources and pictures. This picture is a direct screen capture from KnotPlot, rendered entirely in OpenGL, an environment for portable, interactive graphics applications.

--- Rob Scharein
ashley.jpg
ashley.jpg"Ashley Knot," by by Rob Scharein (Centre for Experimental and Constructive
Mathematics, Simon Fraser University, B.C., Canada)

This example illustrates the SE rendering mode in KnotPlot, which visualizes the symmetric energy distribution. KnotPlot is a program to visualize and manipulate mathematical knots in three and four dimensions, and the website includes a wealth of resources and pictures. This picture is a direct screen capture from KnotPlot, rendered entirely in OpenGL, an environment for portable, interactive graphics applications.

--- Rob Scharein
8-torus~1.jpg
8-torus.jpg"The 8-Crossing Torus Knot T(4,3)," by Dror Bar-Natan (University of Toronto, Canada)

This is an example of a torus knot. A torus is a surface best described as a doughnut. A torus knot can be thought of as looping around and through the torus. The symbol T(4,3) means that the string making the knot loops through the hole of the torus 4 times, making 3 revolutions. This knot is drawn with TubePlot.

--- Dror Bar-Natan
27-torus~0.jpg
27-torus.jpg"The 27-Crossing Torus Knot T(9,4)," by Dror Bar-Natan (University of Toronto, Canada)

This is an example of a torus knot. A torus is a surface best described as a doughnut. A torus knot can be thought of as looping around and through the torus. The symbol T(9,4) means that the string making the knot loops through the hole of the torus 9 times, making 4 revolutions. This knot is drawn with TubePlot.

--- Dror Bar-Natan
 
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