In Memory Of ...

(2006-2007)

Robert H. Kasriel (1918-2007)
Kasriel, professor emeritus at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), died April 24 at the age of 88. He received his Ph.D. in 1953 from the University of Virginia and taught at Georgia Tech for more than 30 years. Kasriel was the author of Undergraduate Topology, published in 1971. A Georgia Tech School of Mathematics newsletter has more information on Kasriel (pdf, page 24) and remembrances by colleagues. He was an AMS member since 1948.

Maurice Machover (1931-2007)
Machover died on November 13 at the age of 75. He received his Ph.D. in 1963 from New York University. Machover was a member of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science of St. John’s University (New York) since 1967. In addition to research papers, mostly on differential equations, he published many notes and problems in The American Mathematical Monthly. He was an AMS member since 1962.

Benjamin Moyls (1919-2007)
Moyls died November 10 at the age of 88. He received his Ph.D. in 1948 from Harvard University under the direction of Saunders Mac Lane, and was a faculty member at the University of British Columbia. Moyls was an AMS member since 1946.

Beth Sharon Samuels (1975-2007)
Samuels died January 5 at the age of 31. At the time of her death, she was a National Science Foundation Research Training Group Postdoctoral Fellow and visiting assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley. She earned her Ph.D. from Yale University in 2005. Samuels died of breast cancer, which was diagnosed in 2004 when she was six months pregnant. At the time she was also writing her Ph.D. thesis.

Jean E. Lebel (1922-2007)
Lebel died December 14 at the age of 85. He was retired from the University of Toronto, where he received his Ph.D. in 1958. Lebel was an AMS member since 1951.

Ralph Mansfield (1912-2007)
Mansfield died December 17 at the age of 95. After earning his master's degree at the University of Chicago, Mansfield taught at Wright College and Loop College (now Harold Washington College) in the City Colleges of Chicago system. He was an AMS member since 1938. The Chicago Tribune carried an obituary of Mansfield.

Ralph Byers (1955-2007)
Byers, a professor at the University of Kansas, died December 15 at the age of 52. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1983 and was an AMS member since 1977.

Robert Reisel (1925-2007)
Reisel died November 16 at the age of 82. He received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1954 and then joined the faculty at Loyola University Chicago, where he remained until retirement. Reisel was an AMS member since 1951.

Alex F.T.W. Rosenberg (1926-2007)
Rosenberg died October 27 at the age of 80. He received his Ph.D. in 1951 from the University of Chicago, under the direction of Irving Kaplansky, and spent almost all of his career at Northwestern University (1952-1961), Cornell University (1961-1986), and the University of California, Santa Barbara (1986-1994). Rosenberg served as chair at Cornell from 1966 to 1969. He published about 50 research papers, and served as editor of the Proceedings of the AMS from 1960 to 1965 and of the American Mathematical Monthly from 1974 to 1976. In addition, in the early 1970s, he chaired the MAA's Committee on the Undergraduate Program in Mathematics. An obituary with remembrances of Rosenberg and more details about his life is online.

Samuel Karlin (1924-2007)
Karlin died December 18 at the age of 83. Born in Poland, Karlin received his Ph.D. from Princeton University under the direction of Salomon Bochner. He was on the faculty at the California Institute of Technology from 1948 to 1956 before joining the faculty at Stanford University where he spent the remainder of his career. Karlin was a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the National Academy of Sciences. In 1989 he was awarded the National Medal of Science. Karlin authored 10 books and more than 450 articles.

Jun-Iti Nagata (1925-2007)
Nagata died November 6 at the age of 82. He received his Ph.D. in 1956 from the University of Osaka under the direction of Ki-Iti Morita. Nagata was professor emeritus at both Osaka Kyoiku University (Osaka University of Education), where he taught for ten years, and Osaka Dentsu University (Osaka Electrocommunication University), where he taught for five years. He had been an AMS member since 1961.

Richard Ewing (1946-2007)
Ewing died December 5 at the age of 61. He had been vice president for research at Texas A&M University until August of this year. At the time of his death he was a distinguished professor of mathematics and applied mathematics at the university and Mobil Technology Company chair in computational science. Ewing received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1974, then taught at Oakland University, Ohio State University, and the University of Wyoming. He authored or co-authored more than 350 publications and 15 books, and was on the editorial board of 12 journals. Ewing was an AMS member since 1974. An article in the Dallas Morning News has more information.

William "Bill" LeVeque (1923-2007)
LeVeque died December 1 at the age of 84. He was AMS executive director from 1977 to 1988 and served as executive editor of Mathematical Reviews® from 1965 to 1966. At the AMS, LeVeque funded the development of LaTex and helped computerize the Mathematical Reviews® database, making MathSciNet possible. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 1947. LeVeque was a professor at the University of Michigan until 1971, serving as department chair from 1967 to 1970, then moved to Claremont Graduate University. He was an AMS member since 1944. An article in the November 2008 Notices of the AMS has more information.

Stuart Phinney Lloyd (1923-2007)
Lloyd died October 20 at the age of 84. He received his undergraduate degree from the University of Chicago and worked on the Manhattan Project during World War II. In 1951, Lloyd earned his Ph.D. in physics at the University of Illinois. Following a one-year post-doctoral position at the Institute for Advanced Study, he joined the Mathematics Department at Bell Telephone Laboratories, and spent his career there. He published dozens of papers and earned a patent for Bell Labs in the field of underwater sound detection. He is also known for work that enabled NASA to communicate with space probes in the outer reaches of the solar system, which has since found other applications. In 1977 he was elected a Fellow of the Institute of Mathematical Statistics. Lloyd was an AMS member since 1956.

Jasper E. Adams (1942-2007)
Adams died November 9 at the age of 65. He was chair of the Stephen F. Austin University Department of Mathematics and Statistics since 1990. His undergraduate and master's degrees were from SFA. His Ph.D. was from Texas Tech University in 1971. Adams had been on the SFA faculty since 1965. The University's Pine Log has more information.

Richard Gabriel (1920-2007)
Gabriel, professor emeritus at Seton Hall University, died October 2, less than two months before what would have his 87th birthday. He earned his Ph.D. from Rutgers University in 1955 and was an AMS member since 1949.

Henry Kyburg (1928-2007)
Kyburg died October 30 at the age of 79. He received his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 1955 and joined the Department of Philosophy at the University of Rochester in 1965. Later he became part of the University's Computer Science Department. Kyburg published many articles and books on logic, statistical reasoning, and probability. His books include Uncertain Inference, co-authored with Choh Man Teng, and Probability is the Very Guide of Life: The Philosophical Uses of Chance, co-edited with Mariam Thalos. Kyburg joined the AMS in 1959 and was a member until 1993. The University of Rochester has posted more information about Kyburg.

Ralph DeMarr (1930-2007)
DeMarr, professor emeritus at the University of New Mexico, died in early October at the age of 77. He earned his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1961. DeMarr first taught at the University of Washington, after a post-doctoral position at the University of Moscow. He joined the Mathematics Department at the University of New Mexico in 1968 and retired in the mid-1990s. DeMarr was an AMS member since 1960.

Sidney R. Coleman (1937-2007)
Coleman died November 18 at the age of 70. He received his Ph.D. from the California Institute of Technology in 1962 under the direction of Murray Gell-Mann and then joined the faculty at Harvard University, where he spent his entire career. Most of his research was in high-energy theoretical physics, particularly quantum field theory. More information on Coleman can be found on a web page for Sidneyfest, a 2005 conference on quantum field theory and quantum chromodynamics.

Richard Sacksteder (1928-2007)
Sacksteder, professor emeritus at the City University of New York, died November 4 at the age of 79. After earning a bachelor's degree and a master's degree at the University of Chicago, he received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1960. He was an AMS member since 1957.

Ali Amir-Moez (1919-2007)
Amir-Moez died August 25 at the age of 88. He was born in Teheran and served in the Persian army in World War II. In 1955 Amir-Moez received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Los Angeles. He was on the faculty at the University of Idaho, Queens College, Purdue University, the University of Florida, Clarkson College (now Clarkson University), and Texas Tech University. He retired from Texas Tech in 1988. An online obituary has more information. Amir-Moez was an AMS member since 1953.

Charles Amos Hayes (1916-2007)
Hayes died August 26 at the age of 91. He received all his degrees from the University of California, Berkeley, earning his Ph.D. in 1942. Hayes retired from the University of California, Davis. He was an AMS member since 1939.

Juha Heinonen (1960-2007)
Heinonen died October 30 at the age of 47. A leading figure in geometric function theory, Heinonen was born in Finland and received his Ph.D. at the University of Jyväskylä in 1987. In 1988 he joined the faculty at the University of Michigan, and served as associate chair for graduate studies from 2004 to 2007. In 2002 he was invited to give a talk at the International Congress of Mathematicians in Beijing. Heinonen became a member of the Finnish Academy of Science and Letters in 2004. He authored more than 60 research papers, many of which contributed to the creation of the branch of mathematics now called analysis of metric spaces. Heinonen was an editor of Proceedings of the AMS for seven years and was an AMS member since 1987. Information on a memorial for him and a fellowship created in his honor by the University of Michigan Department of Mathematics is on the department website.

Warren M. Hirsch (1918-2007)
Hirsch died July 9, about a month shy of his 89th birthday. He was born in New York City and attended City College of New York and New York University. During World War II, Hirsch was commended for his contributions to operational analysis and logistical planning. In 1952 he earned his Ph.D. from the Courant Insititute and joined the Institute's faculty in 1953. In the early 1970s, Hirsch and Ingemar Nasal worked on the transmission dynamics of the tropical disease schistosomiasis and developed a model that became foundational in mathematical epidemiology. Hirsch retired from the Courant Institute in 1988 and subsequently joined the biomedical sciences faculty at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine where he taught until 1999. The Hirsch conjecture - in the field of linear programming - which he proposed in 1957, is still an open problem. He was an AMS member since 1947. The New York University website has more information.

Graham Robert Allan (1936-2007)
Allan died August 9, four days before his 71st birthday. He was a Wrangler in Part II of the Mathematical Tripos in 1960 and received his Ph.D. from the University of Cambridge in 1964. Allan was on the faculty at Cambridge, Newcastle University, and Leeds University. He was head of pure mathematics at Leeds from 1975 to 1978 and was chairman of the Mathematics Faculty Board at Cambridge in 1997 and 1998. Allan retired in 2003 but continued some teaching until 2006. He was an AMS member since 1989. A notice in the October 2007 issue of the London Mathematical Society Newsletter, from which much of this account is taken, has more information.

Anders Frankild (1971-2007)
Frankild died June 10 at the age of 36. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Copenhagen in 2002. Frankild was a post-doc at the Mathematical Sciences Research Insitute in Berkeley and at the University of Copenhagen. He was an AMS member since 2005.

David Geiger (1928-2007)
Geiger died October 11 at the age of 79. He received his bachelor's degree and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, the latter degre in 1960. Geiger was an AMS member since 1969.

Herman Meyer (1912-2007)
Meyer died August 3 at the age of 95. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 1941 under the direction of Lawrence Graves. Before his retirement, Meyer was a member of the faculty at the University of Miami. He was an AMS member since 1940.

Krzysztof Galicki (1958-2007)
Galicki died September 24 at the age of 49 after lying in a coma from a tragic accident suffered on July 8, 2007 while hiking in the Swiss Alps. He was born in Poland and came to the US in the 1980s. In 1987 he received his Ph.D. degree in physics from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. After postdoc positions in mathematics at Rice University and the Institute for Advanced Study, Galicki joined the faculty at the University of New Mexico in 1990 and was a professor there at the time of his death. He is best known for his work, stemming from his thesis, on quaternionic Kaehler reduction, and his later work on Sasaki-Einstein geometry, a compilation of which is about to appear in a book, co-authored with Charles Boyer, entitled Sasakian Geometry. A memorial service was held for Professor Galicki at the Alumni Chapel of the University of New Mexico on November 10.

Robert Payton (1929-2007)
Payton died August 15 at the age of 78. He was born January 1, 1929 in Louisville, Kentucky. After getting a master's degree from Yale University and serving in the US Army for two years, Payton earned his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1959. From 1964 to 1999 he was a member of the faculty at Adelphi University. Payton served as treasurer of the Metropolitan New York section of the Mathematical Association of America from 1980 to 1994. He was an AMS member since 1970. The Villager carried an obituary of Payton.

Mircea Puta (1950-2007)
Puta died on July 26 at the age of 57. He studied mathematics at the University of Timisoara (now, the West University of Timisoara, Romania). He received his master's degree from the University of Bucharest in 1974 and his D. Sc. from the University of Timisoara in 1979. In 1980 he joined the faculty at the University of Timisoara, where he spent nearly his entire career in the mathematics department. Puta authored or co-authored approximately 190 papers and articles, three books, five monographs, and had 14 doctoral students. He was awarded a Simion Stoilow prize of the Romanian Academy of Sciences in 1983. Puta joined the AMS in 1979.

Kenneth Cooke (1925-2007)
Cooke died August 25 at the age of 82. He authored nearly 100 papers and was known for his work in mathematical biology, especially for his research into epidemics. Cooke received his bachelor's degree from Pomona College in 1947, after serving in World War II. He earned his graduate degrees from Stanford University, getting his Ph.D. in 1952. Cooke taught at Washington State University until 1957, at which time he returned to Pomona College. He remained there until his retirement, serving as chair of the department for 10 years. He was an AMS member since 1950. An obituary in the San Bernardino Sun has more information.

Stanley Zietz (1950-2007)
Zietz died May 27 at the age of 56. He received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1977. Zietz was department chair at the University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, and previously had been a professor at Drexel University. He was an AMS member since 1990.

Victor "Vic" Klee (1925-2007)
Klee died August 17 at the age of 81. Klee received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 1949. In 1953 he joined the faculty at the University of Washington, where he remained for 47 years until his retirement in 2000. Klee published over 200 papers and had 36 doctoral students. He was president of the MAA from 1971 to 1972. The University of Washington Department of Mathematics has posted a page with more information on Klee. He was an AMS member since 1946.

Thomas Brylawski (1944-2007)
Brylawski, a researcher in matroid theory and an expert on some aspects of mathematics in art, died July 18. He referred to Gian-Carlo Rota of M.I.T. as his Ph.D. thesis adviser. He met Rota when he was an undergraduate at M.I.T. (Class of '66) and received his Ph.D. from Dartmouth in 1970. Brylawski subsequently spent nearly his entire career in the mathematics department of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. He wrote approximately 44 papers and articles. A list appears within the memorial website. This website also includes information for a September 9 memorial service in Washington, D.C., images of several mathematically inspired paintings by Brylawski, and remembrances from colleagues, students, and friends. An obituary appeared in the Washington Post on August 10.

Nikolay V. Azbelev (1922-2006)
Azbelev, professor emeritus at Perm State Technical University (Russia), died November 3 at the age of 84. He had been a leading figure in differential and integral equations for over 40 years. At the time of his death, Azbelev was the head of the Scientific Research Center for Functional Differential Equations at Perm State Technical University and had been since 1994. He was an AMS member since 1995.

Dov Tamari (1911-2006)
Tamari died August 11 at the age of 95. Born Bernhard Teitler, he attended the universitites of Vienna, Giessen, and Frankfurt, but in 1933 as the Nazis were coming to power, he left Germany and immigrated to Palestine with his family. Tamari resumed his studies at the Hebrew University, where he received his master's degree, and later continued his studies in France, receiving his D.Sc. at the Sorbonne. He participated in the seminars of the Bourbaki group in the late 1940's and early 1950's. He was chair of the mathematics department at the State University of New York at Buffalo, and also held professorships at the University of Rochester, at California State University, and at the University of California, Chico. Tamari was twice a member of the Institute for Advanced Study. Shortly before his death, Tamari finished a book on German mathematician Moritz Pasch (1843-1930), which will be published in November. He was an AMS member since 1950.

D. Ransom Whitney (1915-2007)
Whitney died August 16 at the age of 91. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from Oberlin College and Princeton University, respectively. Following his service in World War II, he received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1948 and subsequently joined the faculty there. Whitney was one of the developers of a statistical test to determine if two samples are from the same distribution. He was instrumental in creating the statistics department at Ohio State and was chair of the department in the early 1970's. Whitney was an AMS member since 1942.

Radu Theodorescu (1933-2007)
Theodorescu died on August 14 at the age of 74. He was born in Bucharest (Romania) and studied mathematics at the University of Bucharest, receiving his D.Sc. in 1967. In 1968 he joined Université Laval in Québec, and retired from the university in 1999. Theodorescu authored or co-authored more than 160 papers. He was an AMS member since 1970.

Atle Selberg (1917-2007)
Selberg, who had a major influence in mathematics and especially in analytic number theory during the 20th century, died on August 6. Born on June 14, 1917, in Langesund, Norway, he received his Ph.D. in 1943 from the University of Oslo. He is perhaps best known for his work on the zeros of the Riemann zeta function, for which he was awarded a Fields Medal in 1950, and for his elementary proof of the prime number theorem. The impact of his work can be seen in the many mathematical terms that bear his name: the Selberg trace formula, the Selberg sieve, the Selberg integral, the Selberg class, and the Selberg zeta function. Since the late 1940s he has been on the faculty of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, and he retired in 1987. His honors include the 1986 Wolf Prize in Mathematics. The biography of Selberg on the MacTutor History of Mathematics web site has further details about his life.

Walter Brady (1933-2007)
Brady died January 23 at the age of 73. After serving in the US Navy, Brady received his master's degree from Harvard University in 1960 and his Ph.D. from Indiana University in 1967. He joined the mathematics department at Connecticut College that same year and taught there for 34 years. Brady was an AMS member since 1968. A tribute to him by Perry Susskind, professor of mathematics at Connecticut College, is online.

John Ewell (1928-2007)
Ewell died July 21 at the age of 79. After graduating from Morehouse College in 1948 with a degree in chemistry, Ewell received his graduate degrees in mathematics, earning his master's degree in 1955 and his Ph.D. in 1966, both from the University of California at Los Angeles. He taught at Northern Illinois University for 25 years before retiring in 1998. Ewell published almost 50 papers, including four after his retirement. He was an AMS member since 1973. More information on Ewell is online at the Mathematicians of the African Diaspora website.

James (Jay) Boland (1958-2006)
Boland died December 16. He received his Ph.D. from Clemson University in 1991 and began teaching at East Tennessee State University, where he remained until his death. In addition to being on the mathematics faculty, Boland also served as director of the East Tennessee State University Honors Program. He was an AMS member since 1991.

William Howard Gustafson (1944-2007)
William H. Gustafson died on July 16, 2007. After earning his doctoral degree in mathematics in 1970 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, he was a teaching fellow at the University of Illinois from 1966-1970. He was an assistant professor at Indiana University from 1970-1976, a visiting assistant professor at Brandeis University from 1972-1973, and in 1976 he joined the faculty at Texas Tech University, where he was promoted to associate professor in 1980 and professor in 1986. He remained on the faculty until his retirement in 2003. Dr. Gustafson’s expertise was in ring theory and algebra. He was the author or co-author of over 40 published papers and he presented numerous invited addresses and colloquia throughout the country and in Germany, Sweden, Denmark, and Canada. He organized the department’s colloquium series for many years. In 1977 Gustafson was among the recipients of the Mathematical Association of America's Lester R. Ford Award in recognition of the article "American mathematics from 1940 to the day before yesterday" (American Mathematical Monthly 83 [1976], 503-516). In addition to his interest in mathematics, Gustafson enjoyed music and became interested in amateur radio. He had been a member of the AMS for 38 years. Services will be held at a future date in North Falmouth, Massachusetts. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions in Dr. Gustafson’s name may be made to the Lubbock Amateur Radio Club (3801-68th Street, Lubbock, TX 79413) to support its emergency mobile communications van or to the Department of Mathematics and Statistics, (Box 41042, Lubbock, TX 79409-1042) at Texas Tech University.

Azelle Brown Waltcher (1925-2007)
Waltcher died May 6 at the age of 82. She received her Ph.D. in 1954 from the Courant Institute at New York University. Waltcher taught at Hofstra University for more than 40 years. She served as chair of the MAA's Metropolitan New York section from 1959 to 1960 and held other offices in the section as well. Waltcher was an AMS member since 1946.

John Kalman (1928-2007)
Kalman died June 11. He received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1955 under the direction of George Mackey. He then returned to New Zealand where he joined the University of Auckland Department of Mathematics. Kalman served as head of the department during the 1960's, at which time he was instrumental in establishing the Mathematical Chronicle, now the New Zealand Journal of Mathematics. He retired from the department in 1993. The department has posted a notice about Kalman and his career. He was an AMS member since 1971.

John Harvey (1934-2007)
Harvey died May 5 in New Orleans. He received his Ph.D. from Tulane University in 1961. Harvey then taught at the University of Illinois before moving to the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1966, retiring from there in 2001. He was an active researcher in mathematics and mathematics education. A page on the MAA site has more information on Harvey and his career. He was an AMS member since 1958.

Kyungho Oh (1959-2007)
Oh died June 11, a few weeks after his 48th birthday. He received his undergraduate degree at Seoul National University (South Korea) and his Ph.D. from Purdue University in 1990. He then joined the mathematics faculty at the University of Missouri-St. Louis where he remained until his death. Oh was an AMS member since 1982.

Joseph Vittitow (1957-2007)
Vittitow died February 9 at the age of 49. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1989. At the time of his death, he was teaching at East Carolina University. Vittitow was an AMS member since 2002.

Felice Ronga (1942-2007)
Ronga died May 22 at the age of 64. He received his doctorate from the University of Geneva in 1970 and spent his career in the university's mathematics department. He was an AMS member since 1973.

John "Jack" Todd (1911-2007)
Todd, a pioneer in the development of numerical analysis and a key player in the creation of some of the first large computers, died June 21 at the age of 96. He graduated from Queen's University in Belfast (Northern Ireland) in 1931 and enrolled at the University of Cambridge, working under J.E. Littlewood and G.H. Hardy. Littlewood did not have a doctorate and disapproved of doctoral degrees, so Todd never received a higher degree, eventually becoming one of the very few professors at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) without one. After the end of World War II in Europe, during which Todd served in the British Admiralty, he saved the Mathematical Research Institute at Oberwolfach from being destroyed, calling it "probably the best thing I ever did for mathematics." Todd and his wife Olga Taussky-Todd, herself a noted mathematician, later moved to the U.S. and joined the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology). In 1957, the couple moved to Caltech where they spent the rest of their careers. Taussky-Todd was the first woman with a formal teaching position at Caltech and the first to receive a full professorship. In a Caltech press release, Thomas A. Tombrello, chair of the Caltech Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy said, "Jack and his wife Olga were among the pioneers who made us what we are in teaching and research in mathematics. Our sense of collegiality and common purpose are a tribute to them." Todd was an AMS member since 1948.

John C. Mairhuber (1922-2007)
Mairhuber died June 13 at the age of 84. He was born in Rochester, New York. After receiving his Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1959, Mairhuber taught at Richmond University and the University of New Hampshire. He became head of the mathematics department at the University of Maine in 1968, where he taught for the remainder of his career. Mairhuber was an AMS member since 1952.

Joseph P. Heisler (1934-2007)
Brother Heisler died May 27 at the age of 72. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1965. Heisler taught both secondary and university level mathematics in his career, including teaching at St. Edward's University in Austin, Texas and California State University, Northridge. He also did work on satellite orbital technology for the U.S. Navy. Heisler was an AMS member since 1986.

Frank Knight (1933-2007)
Knight died March 19. He received his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1959. Knight then joined the faculty at the University of Minnesota, and later moved to the University of Illinois, where he taught from 1963 to 1991. He introduced the prediction process to probability theory. Knight was an AMS member since 1956. The University of Illinois has posted an article about Knight by Donald Burkholder.

Monroe H. Martin (1907-2007)
Martin died March 12, a little over a month after his 100th birthday. He received his bachelor's degree from Lebanon Valley College in 1928 and his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University in 1932. Martin taught at the University of Maryland, serving as department chair and as Director of the Insitute for Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathematics. The Monroe H. Martin Prize, created to commemorate Martin's achievements, is given every five years by the university's Institute for Physical Science and Technology. He was an AMS member since 1929.

Kenneth Magill (1933-2007)
Magill died February 22. He received his Ph.D. from Pennsylvania State University in 1963 and then joined the faculty at the State University of New York at Buffalo. Magill served as chair of the department from 1967 to 1970 and retired in 2004. He also served as chair of the Seaway Section of the Mathematical Association of America. Magill published more than 150 papers, mostly on topological semigroups. He was an AMS member since 1960.

Roy Reeves (1922-2007)
Reeves died in Granville, Ohio on May 5, at the age of 84. He received his Ph.D. from Iowa State University in 1951 and was an AMS member since 1950.

Deborah Tepper Haimo (1921-2007)
Deborah Tepper Haimo died on May 17, 2007 in Claremont, CA. After receiving her undergraduate degree from Radcliffe College and Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1964 she went on to teach mathematics at the University of Missouri-St. Louis. In her retirement she was engaged in activities in the mathematics department at the University of California, San Diego. She served as president of the Mathematical Association of America from 1991-1992, at which time the association established the Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award for Distinguished College or University Teaching of Mathematics. Haimo was chair of the AMS's Arnold Ross Lecture Committee and served on many national and international panels and committees related to mathematics education. All the while she continued her research in classical analysis, specifically on generalizations of the heat equation, special functions, and harmonic analysis. Haimo was a role model for young women interested in mathematics, and the Association for Women in Mathematics has posted a brief article Haimo wrote about her own life and career, "In Her Own Words," originally published in The Notices of the AMS, Vol. 38, No. 7, Sept. 1991, pp. 702-706). Haimo had been a member of the AMS since 1947.

Alfred B. Willcox (1925-2007)
Alfred B. Willcox, known as "A.B.", died on May 15, 2007 in Wallingford, CT. He received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Yale University and was a professor at Amherst College from 1953-1968, after which he served as Executive Director of the Mathematical Association of America until 1990. He authored and co-authored mathematics textbooks and had been a member of the AMS since 1949.

Jack Bazer (1924-2007)
Bazer died March 30. He received his Ph.D. from New York University in 1953, after receiving his bachelor's and master's degrees from Cornell University and Columbia University, respectively. Bazer taught at New York University's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences for 37 years, before retiring in the 1990s. In the 1970s he was chair of New York University's Washington Square math department, one of the university's two campuses at the time. Bazer was an AMS member since 1948.

Emma Lehmer (1906-2007)
Lehmer died May 7 a few months after her 100th birthday. Emma Lehmer, née Trotskaia, was born in Samara, Russia and was raised in Harbin, China. She graduated with honors in 1928 from the University of California, Berkeley. That same year she married Derrick (Dick) Lehmer. In 1930, Lehmer received her master's degree from Brown University. Results from her master's thesis were published in April of that year in the Bulletin of the AMS. She wrote approximately 60 papers in number theory, 21 of which were joint with Dick Lehmer, and spent most of her career in Berkeley. In 1992, John Brillhart wrote in Acta Arithmetica: "In the sixty years during which they collaborated, the Lehmers were a research team who personally influenced a large number of people with their knowledge, their courtesy and sociability, and their fine mathematical work." A biography of Emma Lehmer is online, and UC Berkeley News posted an obituary (May 11), which includes a link to "The Lehmers at Berkeley" (UC Berkeley Bancroft Library Exhibit).

Steven Haataja (1960-2006)
Haataja died December 5 at the age of 46. He grew up in South Dakota and received his Ph.D. from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in 2006 under the direction of John Meakin and Allan Donsig. At the time of his death, Haataja was in his first year at Chadron State College in Nebraska. He was an AMS member since 1987.

James Eells (1926-2007)
Eells died February 14 at the age of 80. Born in Cleveland, he got his undergraduate degree at Bowdoin College, and his graduate degrees at Harvard University, receiving his Ph.D. in 1954 under the direction of Hassler Whitney. In 1969 after holding positions at the Institute for Advanced Study, the University of California, Berkeley, Columbia Univeristy, and Cornell University, Eells moved to the United Kingdom where he was the first Professor of Analysis at the University of Warwick. He was also the first head of the mathematics group at the Trieste International Center of Theoretical Physics. Eells did foundational work in harmonic map theory, geometric evolutions, and geometric stochastic analysis. He retired from Warwick in 1992. In an obituary in the London Mathematical Society Newsletter, from which much of this notice is taken, David Elworthy wrote that Eells's memory was so good that it was claimed that in his early days he could recognize every member of the AMS. Eells was an AMS member since 1950.

Frank Burk (1942-2007)
Burk died on March 17. He was born September 29, 1942 in Kirksville, Missouri and graduated from the University of Missouri in 1960. Burk earned his Ph.D. in partial differential equations from the University of California, Riverside in 1969. He joined the faculty at California State University, Chico in 1968 and taught there until 2004. He also taught at Butte College. Burk was an AMS member since 1994.

Fokko du Cloux (1954-2006)
Fokko du Cloux died on November 10 at the age of 52. He was born December 20, 1954, in Rheden in the Netherlands. Du Cloux grew up in Spain, and was an undergraduate at École Polytechnique in Paris, graduating in 1978. He completed a Docteur d'État there in 1984, under Alain Guichardet. From 1985 to 1991 he was a Chargé de Recherche of the CNRS at École Polytechnique, and from 1991 a professor at Université Lyon-I. Du Cloux combined deep insight into the mathematics of Coxeter groups with tremendous skill as a programmer. His program Coxeter sets the standard for computations in these groups. During the last four years of his life he began work on an equally powerful and general program Atlas for the structure and representation theory of real reductive groups. He was an AMS member since 1984.

Paul Cohen (1934-2007)
Paul Joseph Cohen died on March 23 at the age of 72. He made fundamental contributions to mathematical logic, mathematical analysis, and partial differential equations. In particular in solving Hilbert's first problem, "Cantor's Problem on the Cardinal of the Continuum," in which he proved that the axiom of choice and the generalized continuum hypothesis are independent of Zermelo Fraenkel Set Theory, he introduced the powerful technique of forcing, which today remains one of the basic tools in set theory. For this work he was awarded a Fields Medal in 1966. In addition to the Fields Medal, Cohen was recognized with many awards and honors, including the National Medal of Science, the Bôcher Memorial Prize - for his paper "On a conjecture of Littlewood and idempotent measures" (American Journal of Mathematics, 1960), membership in the National Academy of Sciences, and an honorary foreign membership of the London Mathematical Society. He graduated from Stuyvesant High School and Brooklyn College, and did his graduate work at the University of Chicago, where he received his Ph.D. in 1958 under the direction of Antoni Zygmund. He was a professor of mathematics at Stanford University from 1959 until 2004, when he moved to emeritus status.

Peter Ladislaw Hammer (1936-2006)
Hammer died December 27 at the age of 70. He was born in Timisoara, Romania and earned his Ph.D. at the University of Bucharest. He and his wife, Anca, defected to Israel in 1967, and he became a professor at the Technion. Later he moved to Canada where he taught at the University of Montreal and the University of Waterloo. In 1983 he became a professor at Rutgers University. Hammer was the founding director of the Rutgers University Center for Operations Research and also founded many professional journals. His publications include 19 books and over 240 papers. Hammer was an AMS member since 1970. Rutgers University has more information on its website.

 

Gustave Choquet (1915-2006)
Choquet died November 14. He received his doctorate in 1946 from École Normale Supérieure under the direction of Arnaud Denjoy. Choquet published over 150 papers and 11 books in topology, set theory, measure theory, and functional analysis. He was a member of the Académie des Sciences, an officer of the Légion d'Honneur, an honorary member of the London Mathematical Society, and served as president of the International Commission for the Study and Improvement of Mathematical Teaching from the time of its founding in 1950 to 1962. Choquet was an AMS member since 1948.

Marvin G. Moore (1908-2007)
Moore died January 12, about one month after his 98th birthday. He was professor emeritus at Bradley University, where he served as chair from 1958 to 1970. Moore received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1938, the same year he joined the AMS.

Ralph Henstock (1923-2007)
Henstock had appointments at Queen's University of Belfast, the University of Bristol, Lancaster University, and the New University of Ulster, before retiring in 1988. He may best be remembered for the generalized Riemann integral that he and Jaroslav Kurzweil discovered independently in the 1950's. Henstock died January 6 at the age of 83.

Elbridge Putnam Vance (1915-2007)
Vance passed away on February 18, 2007. He had taught mathematics at Oberlin College from 1943 to 1983, and headed the mathematics department there from 1948 to 1975. He also wrote textbooks; spent several years as chair and chief reader for the Advanced Placement Program in Mathematics for the College Entrance Examination Board; and was associate editor in charge of film and television reviews for the American Mathematics Monthly. Among his many other roles he tutored and mentored students. He had been a member of the AMS since 1938. There are two scholarships set up in his name at Oberlin College to which donations can be made, for students demonstrating marked interest and ability in mathematics who have had less opportunity than others to study beyond the high school level.

Herbert Greenberg (1921-2007)
Greenberg, professor emeritus at the University of Denver, died on January 1, 2007. He had founded and chaired the mathematics deparment at the university in the early 1960s, and remained there for 30 years. He also chaired the National Science Foundation committee for awarding grants for scientific research. Greenberg attended Northwestern University when he was just 14 years old, and received his bachelor's and master's degrees there. He received his Ph.D. from Brown University. The University of Denver DU Today article says "Greenberg was a principal creator of variational principles in plasticity. He was at the forefront of computer technology as programmer of an early mainframe computer and designed systems for computer courses as early as the 1950s." The Denver Post also published an obituary on February 12, 2007.

Casper Goffman (1913-2006)
Goffman died September 25. He received his Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 1942. He was on the faculty at Purdue University from 1957 until his retirement in 1978. After 1978 he taught part-time in the department for six years. The department newsletter, Math PUrview, has recollections of Goffman by students and colleagues. He was an AMS member since 1943.

Jack Z'Ev Reichman (1950-2006)
Reichman died December 25 at the age of 56. He received his Ph.D. from SUNY-Stony Brook in 1982 and was an employee at Standard & Poor's for many years. Reichman was an AMS member since 1976.

Marvin J. Kohn (1944-2007)
Kohn died January 2. He was born January 1, 1944 in Minneapolis. He received his bachelor's degree, master's degree, and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago. His Ph.D. came in 1970, under the direction of Antoni Zygmund. Kohn was a professor at Brooklyn College (CUNY), where he taught for over 30 years. He was an AMS member since 1968.

Xiao-Song Lin (1957-2007)
Lin died January 14. Born in China, he began his college studies at the start of the Cultural Revolution and wound up spending seven years as a worker in a steel mill. He resumed his studies after the Cultural Revolution, getting degrees from Jiangsu Normal College (now Suzhou University) and Peking University. Lin received his Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego in 1988. He was an assistant professor and associate professor at Columbia University from 1988 to 1995 and then moved to the University of California, Riverside where he was a professor at the time of his death.

Gregory Maxwell Kelly (1930-2007)
"Max" Kelly died January 26 at the age of 76. He was emeritus professor at the University of Sydney (Australia) and was mathematically active when he died. Kelly was born in Sydney and got his undergraduate degree from the University of Sydney. He received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University under the direction of Shaun Wylie. He was a major contributor to category theory, and was instrumental in developing the field in Australia. Kelly was a fellow of the Australian Academy of Science, elected in 1972.

Leon W. Rutland (1919-2006)
Rutland died August 28 at the age of 87. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from what is now East Texas State University. After serving in World War II, he received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado in 1954. In 1964 he left the University of Colorado to become chair of the department at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech). Rutland remained at the university after stepping down as chair. He was an AMS member since 1959.

Daniel A. Robinson (1932-2007)
Robinson died January 31. He was a professor emeritus at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Robinson received his bachelor's degree at the New York State College for Teachers (now SUNY-Albany), his master's at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and his Ph.D. in 1964 from the University of Wisconsin. During his career, he wrote over 100 reviews for Mathematical Reviews®. He was an AMS member for 50 years.

Sumangali Kidambi Srinivasan (1930-2006)
Srinivasan died October 21. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Madras in 1958, and joined the Indian Institute of Technology at its inception in 1959. While there he served as department head, dean of Research Programs, and member of the Board of Governors. Srinivasan also had visiting assignments at universities in the US, Australia, Canada, Singapore, and Germany. He was a life member of the Indian Mathematical Society, an elected fellow of the Indian Academy of Sciences, and a founder fellow of the Tamil Nadu Academy of the Sciences. Srinivasan was an AMS member since 2000.

Robert Tompson (1920-2007)
Tompson died January 6, one day short of his 87th birthday. Tompson served in World War II and resumed his graduate studies following the war. He received his master's degree from the University of Nevada, Reno and his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1953. Following work at Bell Labs and some time on the faculty at Florida State University, he joined the faculty at the University of Nevada, Reno where he taught from 1956 to 1991. He was chair of the department for 10 years and was instrumental in the formation of the Desert Research Institute, an important part of the university's growth. Tompson was a member of the AMS since 1952. The University of Nevada, Reno has more information on Tompson.

Morris Newman (1924-2007)
Newman died on January 4 at the age of 82 in Santa Barbara, California. His parents were Russian immigrants who met in Brooklyn, New York after escaping the pogroms in the early 1900s. Newman graduated from New York University with a degree in mathematics, and later received a master's degree from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania in 1952 under the direction of Hans Rademacher. He worked as a research mathematician for 25 years at the National Bureau of Standards (now the National Institute of Standards and Technology). In 1966 Newman received a gold medal from the Department of Commerce for his development of a set of matrix programs. He moved to California in 1977 where he became a professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He published about 100 papers, wrote two books, and served as an editor of two journals. Although Newman retired in 1993, he continued to work with graduate students through early 2005. He was a Life Member of the Society, joining in 1946.

Anatol Rapoport (1911-2007)
Rapoport, one of the founders of general systems theory, died on January 20. He had contributed to mathematical biology and to mathematical modeling of social interaction and stochastic models of contagion. He was known for combining his mathematical expertise with psychological insights in the study of game theory and semantics. He was born in Russia and came to the U.S. in 1922, and received his Ph.D. in mathematics at the University of Chicago. After serving in WWII he served on the Committee on Mathematical Biology at the University of Chicago, where he was an assistant professor (1947-1954). In 1954 Rapoport founded the Society for General Systems Research. He was associate professor from 1955 to 1960, and professor and senior research mathematician from 1960 to 1968, both at the Mental Health Research Institute, University of Michigan. During 1968 and 1969 he was a professor of applied math at the Technical University of Denmark, after which he returned to the Mental Health Research Institute as a professor of math and biology from 1969 to 1970. From 1970 until his retirement he was professor of psychology and mathematics at the University of Toronto. Rapoport was also an accomplished pianist and had been a member of the AMS since 1947.

Roy Leipnik (1924-2006)
Leipnik died October 10. He received his bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Chicago. While pursuing his doctorate at the University of California, Berkeley, he spent two years working at the Institute for Advanced Study. In 1950 he received his Ph.D. from Berkeley under the direction of Anthony Morse. He worked at and traveled to many institutions, but the majority of his career - 30 years - was spent at the University of California, Santa Barbara. The Roy Leipnik Environmental Fund has been set up at the University in his honor to provide stipends for graduate students working on environmental issues. Leipnik was an AMS member since 1947.

Martin Kruskal (1925-2006)
Kruskal died December 26 at the age of 81. Kruskal received his Ph.D. in 1952 from New York University under the direction of Richard Courant and Bernard Friedman. He then moved to Princeton University where he remained until 1989. At the time of his death he was a professor emeritus at Princeton and David Hilbert Professor of Mathematics at Rutgers University. He won the National Medal of Science in 1993 and a Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research in 2006, along with Clifford Gardner, John Greene, and Robert Miura, for their paper "Korteweg-deVries equation and generalizations.VI. Methods for exact solution" (Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics, 1974). Kruskal was a member of the National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a foreign member of the Royal Society of London and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences, and an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Society of Edinburgh. More on Kruskal is in an address given on occasion of the conferment to him of an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science from Heriot-Watt University. He was an AMS member since 1951.

Steven Galovich (1945-2006)
Steve Galovich died December 14. He received his Ph.D. from Brown University in 1972. He taught at Carleton College for 20 years and later moved to Lake Forest College, where he served as provost and dean of the faculty for 10 years. Lake Forest College has posted an obituary. Galovich was known for his writing, winning the Mathematical Association of America's Carl B. Allendoerfer Award for expository writing in 1988 for his article "Products of Sines and Cosines" (Mathematics Magazine, 1987, pages 105-113). He was an AMS member since 1969.

Everett Pitcher (1912-2006)
Everett Pitcher, who served as AMS Secretary from 1967 to 1988, died December 4 at the age of 94. He was born in Hanover, New Hampshire to mathematical parents: His father received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago under E.H. Moore, and his mother was a math teacher. Pitcher himself received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1935 under the direction of Marston Morse. He joined the faculty of Lehigh University in 1938 and spent almost all of the rest of his academic career there, serving as chair from 1960 until his retirement from the department in 1978. Pitcher was a founder of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics, a member of its Board of Trustees from 1961 to 1963, and an AMS Associate Secretary from 1959 to 1966. In 1985 he received the Mathematical Association of America Award for Distinguished Service. A lecture series at Lehigh and a chair are named in his honor. Pitcher was an AMS member since 1935.

Don Kreider (1931-2006)
Kreider died December 7. He was very active in the Mathematical Association of America (MAA), serving as treasurer from 1989-1991, as president from 1993-1994, and on the Board of Governors from 1995-1999. Kreider received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1959. He taught at Dartmouth College from 1960 to 1997, serving as chair of the Deparment of Mathematics twice, and as vice president of the college. In the 1960s, he joined the Entebbe Project, spending three summers in Africa working with local teachers and developing a high school curriculum. In an obituary on the MAA website, former MAA Executive Director Marcia Sward said, "Wisdom, kindness, and humanity were Don's hallmarks throughout the twenty years of our professional relationship. Don could always be relied upon to provide thoughtful advice on any issue, to take the high road in any situation, and to cheerfully undertake any task." He had been an AMS member since 1956.

Bohumil (Mila) Cenkl (1934-2006)
Cenkl died on May 4. He was born in Bohunovice in what is now the Czech Republic. He earned his Doctorate of Science in 1968 at Charles University in Prague when the Soviet Union occupied his country. That same year he, his wife, and their son Micha moved to the West, carrying what they could without being arrested. Cenkl joined the mathematics faculty at Northeastern University in 1969. He published over 50 papers in differential geometry and algebraic topology. The Northeastern University Department of Mathematics has posted an obituary with links to Cenkl's publications and art. He was an AMS member since 1971.

Arienne Balser (1930-2006)
Balser died April 21. Born in New York, she attended Brooklyn College and graduated from Columbia University. After teaching math for many years, she stayed home to raise her two children. Balser, nee Silverstein, and her daughter, Amy Blumenthal, were part of the PBS show Almost Home. Balser was an AMS member since 1951.

Philip Dwinger (1914-2006)
Dwinger died on November 2 in Chicago, Illinois at the age of 92. He worked in several areas of mathematics but is best known for his research on Boolean algebras and lattice theory and his books on these subjects. He received his doctorate in 1938 from the University of Leiden and held professorships at the University of Indonesia, Purdue University, and the Technical University of Delft before joining the faculty of the University of Illinois at Chicago in 1965. Dwinger served as Head of the Department of Mathematics at the university from 1975 to 1980 and as Dean of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences from 1980 until his retirement in 1985. He was a correspondent of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences. Dwinger had been a member of the AMS since 1953.

G. Baley Price (1905-2006)
Price died November 7 at the age of 101. He was a very active member of the mathematical community, serving as president of the Mathematical Association of America (1957-1958), first chairman of the Conference Board of the Mathematical Sciences (1959-1960), executive secretary of the CBMS (1960-1962), editor of the Bulletin of the AMS (1950-1957), and helping launch Mathematical Reviews® Price received his Ph.D. in 1932 from Harvard University under the direction of G.D. Birkhoff. He was on the faculty at the University of Kansas from 1937 to 1975, and was chair from 1951 to 1970. He helped form the School Mathematics Study Group, which led to the "New Math" in the 1960s. In World War II, Price did operations research work as a civilian for the U.S. Army Eighth Air Force. He received the MAA's Distinguished Service Award in 1970. The May 2005 Notices of the AMS contains an article celebrating his 100th birthday. Also online is an article he wrote in 1990 on the founding of Mathematical Reviews®. Price joined the AMS in 1929.

Robert C.F. Bartels (1911-2006)
Bartels, retired professor of Mathematics at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and retired director of the University of Michigan Computing Center, passed away on September 9, 2006. After earning a bachelor's degree in engineering he became a junior technician at Bell Telephone Laboratories in New Jersey. While in the graduate program in electrical engineering at the University Wisconsin in Madision Bartels dropped in to hear a mathematics lecture, which inspired him to change his major. He earned his Ph.D. degree in mathematics in 1938. That year he married Virginia Terwilliger and accepted a position at the University of Michigan, where he remained (except during World War II) until 2006. Bartels had been an AMS member since 1937.

William Parry (1934-2006)
William "Bill" Parry died on August 20, 2006 at the age of 72. He had received early training at Coventry junior technical school (U.K.), and thanks to the urging of a math teacher there went on to college. He received his Ph.D. in 1960 from Imperial College in London, after which he held a lectureship at Birmingham University (1960-65), a senior lecturership at Sussex (1965-68), and readership at the recently created University of Warwick. During the academic year 1962-1963 he spent some time at Yale University in the U.S., at which time he joined the AMS and remained a member for over 40 years. He gave a well-received address at the 1970 International Congress of Mathematicians in Nice, France, and was then promoted to professor. In 1984 he was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society. A number of important concepts bear his name: the Parry-Daniels map, the Parry-Sullivan invariant and the Parry measure. He was a founder of the journal Ergodic Theory and Dynamical Systems, and was particularly interested in connections between ergodic theory and other areas of mathematics, especially number theory. Parry helped to establish the international reputation of the Warwick University mathematics department, and trained and inspired many research mathematicians who hold academic positions throughout the U.K.

Leon A. Henkin (1921-2006)
Henkin, professor emeritus of mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, had labored much of his career to boost the number of women and underrepresented minorities in the upper levels of mathematics. He died of natural causes at his Oakland home on Nov. 1. Henkin spearheaded and chaired the Special Scholarships Committee at UC Berkeley, co-founded the Summer Mathematics Program on campus, played a central role in developing the Bay Area Mathematics Project, co-led a 1989 study of math literacy in the U.S. commissioned by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and served as the first chair of UC Berkeley's pioneering interdisciplinary Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science. From 1973-75, he was associate director of the Lawrence Hall of Science, a science museum and education research center at UC Berkeley. He was a long-time member of the AMS and supported many other organizations. Read the obituary on the UC Berkeley website.

George B. Thomas (1914-2006)
Thomas, a mathematician who turned a one-year teaching appointment at MIT into a 38-year career, and whose well-regarded textbook has been used around the world, died Oct. 31 of natural causes in State College, Pa. He was 92. He was known for his ability to communicate mathematical concepts. He received his Ph.D. from Cornell in mathematics in 1940, and then came to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, from which he retired in 1978. During World War II, Thomas helped program the differential analyzer for the calculation of firing tables for the Navy. After the Soviet Union launched Sputnik in October 1957, he was part of a national effort to improve math and science education in American schools. He also traveled to India on a Ford Foundation grant to teach Indian instructors how he and his American colleagues taught math. Thomas was a member of the AMS since 1938.

Adrien Douady (1935-2006)
Douady died on November 2. A leading researcher in complex analytic geometry, dynamical systems, and fractals, Douady was a member of Bourbaki from 1959 to 1985. He received his Ph.D. in 1965 under the direction of Henri Cartan. He was a professor at l'École Normale Supérieure and at l'Université d'Orsay. Douady received many honors in his lifetime, among them the Ampère Prize in 1989 from the French Academy of Sciences.

Karen Ames (1953-2006)
Ames died September 28. She received her Ph.D. in applied mathematics from Cornell University in 1980. Ames was a member of the mathematics faculty at the University of Alabama in Huntsville since 1990. She was an AMS member since 1981.

André Dabrowski (1955-2006)
Dabrowski died October 7. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Illinois in 1982. Dabrowski then joined the faculty at the University of Calgary where he remained until 1985. From then on he was on the faculty at the University of Ottawa. At the time of his death Dabrowski was Dean of Science at the University. He was an AMS member since 1977.

Kjartan G. Magnússon (1952-2006)
Magnússon died January 13. He was a professor of biomathematics in the Department of Mathematics at the University of Iceland. There will be a symposium in his memory at the University of Iceland on October 28. Magnússon was an AMS member since 1990.

Kevin K. Blount (1959-2006)
Blount died May 30. He was an assistant professor at Sacred Heart University in Connecticut. Blount received his Bachelor's and Master's degrees from the University of Florida, and got his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University in 1999. Sacred Heart has posted a web page with more information on him.

M. Gweneth Humphreys (1911-2006)
Humphreys, Professor Emerita at Randolph-Macon Woman's College, died October 5 in Lynchburg, Virginia. She was a native of British Columbia and graduated from the University of British Columbia in 1932. After receiving her master's degree in 1933 from Smith College, she earned her Ph.D. in 1935 from the University of Chicago under the direction of Leonard Dickson. Humphreys taught at several women's colleges but spent most of her career at Randolph-Macon. She was a member of the AMS since 1936.

Paul Halmos (1916-2006)
Paul Halmos passed away October 2 in Los Gatos, California. He was the author of more than a dozen books, many of them familiar to mathematicians around the world, and was acknowledged for his expository skill, both in writing and speaking. He received many awards during his lifetime, including the AMS Steele Prize (1983, for his many graduate texts) and the MAA Gung and Hu Award (2000, for distinguished service to mathematics). For many years, he was active in the governance of the AMS, serving in many positions including as vice-president (1981-82).

Marianne Ruth Freundlich Smith (1922-2006)
Freundlich Smith passed away at home in Berkeley, California on July 15. She was born in Karlsruhe, Germany and in 1934 fled to the United States with her parents and sister. She grew up in Queens, NY and attended Queens College. Freundlich Smith received her Ph.D. in 1947 at the University of Illinois. That same year, she moved to Berkeley, where she taught mathematics at the University of California, but when the loyalty oath became an issue, she refused to sign and quit teaching. Freundlich Smith later became a professor at California State College at Hayward (now California State University, Hayward), where she taught for 25 years. A description of her coming to understand analysis is in her article "Eventually" in the May 1998 Notices of the AMS. Freundlich Smith was an AMS member since 1945.

Alfred B. Lehman (1931-2006)
Lehman passed away on May 8. He received his Ph.D. in 1954 from the University of Florida, and worked at Tulane University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the Case Institute, the University of Wisconsin, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, and the Walter Reed Institute, before going to the University of Toronto in 1965. There he was jointly appointed as Professor in the Departments of Mathematics and Computer Science. In 1991 he received the Delbert Ray Fulkerson Prize, jointly awarded by the AMS and the Mathematical Programming Society, for solving, in great generality, an open problem in combinatorial algorithms that had long resisted solution.

Clive Chester (1930-2006)
Chester died February 22 at the age of 75. He received his Ph.D. from New York University in 1955 under the direction of Bernard Friedman, and was an AMS member since 1957.

Zalman Rubinstein (1933-2006)
Professor (emeritus) Zalman Rubinstein of the University of Haifa passed away on September 7. Born in Warsaw, Poland, on June 14, 1933, he completed his Ph.D. under Mishael Zedek at the University of Maryland in 1962, and taught at Carnegie Mellon University, Clark University, and U. Haifa (1972-2006), with visiting positions at Harvard University, the University of Michigan, the University of Colorado, and the University of Tel-Aviv. He was President of the Israel Mathematical Union from 1974 to 1976. Rubinstein was an AMS member since 1962.

Ali-Amir Husain (1973-2006)
Husain died July 17, 2006. He was a faculty member in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Acadia University in Nova Scotia (Canada). Husain received his Ph.D. in 2004 from Texas A&M University under the direction of Roger Smith. He was an AMS member since 1996.

Theodore J. Rivlin (1926-2006)
Rivlin, a leading researcher in the field of approximation theory, passed away on July 22, 2006. After he received his Ph.D. in mathematics from Harvard University in 1953 he was an instructor at Johns Hopkins University; then in the mid to late 1950s was a researcher at the Institute for Mathematical Sciences, New York University and at Fairchild Engine and Airplane Company. He was a Visiting Professor of Computer Science at Stanford University 1969-1970, and in 1966 became an Adjunct Professor of Mathematics at the City University of New York, while working at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center, IBM. The Annals of Numerical Analysis Volume 4, 1997 issue was a special one, "The Heritage of P.L. Chebyshev: A Festschrift in honor of the 70th birthday of T.J. Rivlin." Rivlin had been an AMS member since 1954.

Henry M. Schaerf (1907-2006)
Schaerf, a former actuary for several Polish insurance companies, served on the faculty of the Department of Mathematics at Washington University in St. Louis, and passed away in Seattle, Washington, on March 5, 2006. He did research at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ, in 1953-54, and in 1996 became an Honorary Member of the American Mathematical Society for his over 50 years of affiliation with the Society and for his continued commitment to the mathematics profession.

Maurice L'Abbé (1920-2006)
L'Abbé, professor in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of Montreal, became its director from 1957 to 1968, transforming the department into an important research center in Quebec. He became president of the l'Association canadienne-française pour l'avancement des sciences (ACFAS) in 1964; president of the Société mathématique du Canada 1967-1969; director general of the Conseil de la sciences du Canada 1980-1983; then the first president of the Conseil de la science et de la technologie du Québec. Until 2000 he served on a number of scientific committees and research centers. His influence on mathematics and science in Quebec and Canada was immense, and his accomplishments were recognized with many awards. L'Abbé passed away on July 21, 2006.

George A. Roberts (1940-2006)
Roberts, whose teaching career spanned forty years, passed away on February 13, 2006. After graduating from Wiley College he received his Masters degree from the University of Arizona and went on to become the first African American to earn a Ph.D. in mathematics from Texas A&M University, in 1979. His tenure at Prairie View A&M University began in 1983, where he served on the faculty, many committees, and as Vice President of the Faculty Senate. He was promoted to professor in 1992 and his area of research was complex analysis. His contributions to education included teaching, research and service, for which he received numerous awards. Roberts had been an AMS member since 1987.

Shokichi Iyanaga (1906-2006)
Iyanaga passed away on June 1. Iyanaga received his Ph.D. from Tokyo Imperial University (now the University of Tokyo) in 1931 under the direction of Teiji Takagi. He was vice president of the International Commission on Mathematical Instruction from 1971 to 1974, and president from 1975 to 1978. He also served as a member of the first Executive Committee of the International Mathematical Union, when the union was re-established after World War II, from 1952 to 1954. On the day of his 100th birthday, April 2, 2006, a paper of his, "Travaux de Claude Chevalley sur la théorie du corps de classes: Introduction," was published online in the Japanese Journal of Mathematics (to see the article, click on "First Issue"). Iyanaga was an AMS member since 2000.

Paul F. Conrad (1921-2006)
Conrad passed away on June 25 at the age of 84. Conrad received his degrees from the University of Illinois, culminating in his Ph.D. in 1951 under the direction of Reinhold Baer. He made significant contributions to the field of ordered algebraic structures. He taught at Tulane University from 1951 until 1970 when he accepted a professorship at the University of Kansas. He was a Fulbright lecturer at the University of Ceylon during 1956-57 and a NSF senior postdoctoral fellow at the Australian National University during 1964-65. In 1981, he was appointed the first Henry J. Bischoff Professor of Mathematics at the University of Kansas, and he retired in 1992. Conrad was an AMS member since 1949.

Donald Higman (1928-2006)
Higman died February 13. He received his Ph.D. in 1952 from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign under the direction of Reinhold Baer and taught at the University of Michigan for many years. He and Charles Sims produced the sporadic group of order 44,352,000, now known as HS, the Higman-Sims group. Higman was an AMS member since 1977. He was 77 at the time of his death.

Irving E. Gaskill (1922-2006)
Gaskill died March 9 at the age of 84. He received his bachelor's degree from Trenton State Teachers College, now The College of New Jersey, and his master's from the University of Pennsylvania. Gaskill was a former director of the Mathematics and Computation Laboratory of the Federal Emergency Management Agency. He was an AMS member since 1951.

Frederick Mosteller (1916-2006)
Mosteller died July 23 in Falls Church, Virginia at the age of 89. He was a premier statistician who founded the statistics department at Harvard University. Mosteller received his bachelor's and master's degrees from what is now Carnegie Mellon University, and his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1946. He then joined the Harvard faculty, serving as chair of the statistics department from 1957 to 1971. He retired as chair of the department of health policy and management in 1987. Among his many celebrated works are Inference and Disputed Authorship (1962), written with David Wallace, which identified James Madison as the author of 12 disputed Federalist Papers, and On Equality of Educational Opportunity (1972), co-authored with the future U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan. The Washington Post printed an obituary in its July 25th edition.

Ralph David McWilliams (1930-2006)
McWilliams died May 13 at the age of 75. He received his Ph.D. in 1957 from the University of Tennessee. McWilliams joined the faculty at Florida State University in 1959, serving as chair from 1984 to 1990. He was an AMS member since 1956.

Nathan Mendelsohn (1917-2006)
Mendelsohn, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Manitoba and visiting professor emeritus at the University of Toronto, passed away on July 4, 2006. He was on the first winning Putnam team with Kaplansky and Coleman in 1938, and received his Ph.D. in 1941 at the University of Toronto. He served as professor of mathematics at the University of Manitoba 1948-2005, where he chaired the department for over twenty years. He was awarded the Tory Medal of the Royal Society of Canada in 1979 and was awarded the Order of Canada in 1999. Mendelsohn's work was in group theory, geometry, number theory, lattice theory and combinatorics. He was the first to discover five orthogonal latin squares of order 12, inventing the concept of orthomorphism; the Dulmage- Mendelsohn decomposition, Mendelsohn triple systems, and Mendelsohn designs bear his name. A full obituary of Nathan Mendelsohn is available online.

Dorothy S. Meyler (1908-2006)
Dorothy Skeel Meyler died on June 16 at the age of 97. She had been a member of the London Mathematical Society since 1934, making her the longest-standing member of that Society. After a bout with tuberuclosis in 1931, she recovered and went on to Newnham College, Cambridge to study for her PhD under the supervision of W.V.D. Hodge. During that time she was invited to apply for an Assistant Lectureship and thereby became one of the few women lecturers in Mathematics in the UK. She retired in 1975 after a long career as a respected and influential teacher. Read more about Meyler in A.O. Morris's tribute in the July 2006 issue of the LMS Newsletter.

Anthony F. Ruston (1922-2006)
Ruston, who had served as Secretary and Vice President of the London Mathematical Society, died on June 28. As noted in the July 2006 issue of the LMS Newsletter, Ruston held positions at King's College London and at Sheffield University, before moving to the University of Wales, Bangor, where he was promoted to Reader in 1968, and retired in 1977. His research field was Banach Spaces.

Torkel Franzén (1950-2006)
Franzén, a logician, philospher and mathematician, died on April 19 at the age of 56. He was a university lecturer at the department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering at Luleå University of Technology, Sweden. His major interest was in Gödel's Theorem--about which he wrote a book ("Gödel's Theorem: An Incomplete Guide to Its Use and Abuse" in 2005), "The Popular Impact of Gödel's Incompleteness Theorem," (Notices of the AMS, April 2006, p. 440) and postings on Usenet.

Irving Kaplansky (1917-2006)
Kaplansky died on June 25 at the age of 89. He made significant contributions to algebra and other fields, and was the author of many important texts. He was on the winning team, from the University of Toronto, of the first Putnam competition in 1938 and was the first Putnam Fellow. Kaplansky received his Ph.D. from Harvard in 1941 under the direction of Saunders Mac Lane. He taught at the University of Chicago from 1945 to 1984, serving as chair from 1962 to 1967. Kaplansky was director of the Mathematical Sciences Research Institute from 1984 to 1992. He was very active in AMS governance and in its publications, serving as AMS president from 1985 to 1986. Kaplansky was a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and was an honorary member of the London Mathematical Society. He received the Leroy P. Steele Prize Career Award (now called Lifetime Achievement) in 1989 for "his lasting impact on mathematics, particularly mathematics in America." In his response to the award, he gave this advice: "spend some time every day learning something new that is disjoint from the problem on which you are currently working (remember that this disjointness may be temporary), and read the masters." More information about Kaplansky is available online.

Paul Moritz Cohn (1924-2006)
P. M. Cohn, died on April 20 at the age of 82 of a brain hemorrhage. He was born January 8, 1924 in Hamburg, Germany. Cohn received his Ph.D. from Cambridge in 1952 under the direction of Philip Hall. He was an AMS member since 1962. Cohn's biography is available at the MacTutor site.

Frank Kosier (1934-2006)
Kosier of Solon, Iowa, passed away on June 3 at the age of 71. He was born July 2, 1934 in Lansing, Michigan and received his Ph.D. from Michigan State University in 1960. Kosier taught at the University of Iowa for over 30 years. He was an AMS member since 1958.

Teruhisa Matsusaka (1926-2006)
Matsusaka, who passed away on March 4, 2006, was a key researcher in the field of algebraic geometry. He received his Ph.D. in 1952 at Kyoto University; he was a member of the Brandeis Mathematics Department from 1961 until his retirement in 1994, and was that department's chair from 1984-1986. Matsusaka was invited to address the International Congress of Mathematicians held in Edinburgh in 1958 and was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1966.

L. Gaunce Lewis, Jr. (1949-2006)
Lewis died on May 17 at the age of 56. He was born in Boston, Massachusetts and grew up in Abilene, Texas. Lewis received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and his graduate degrees from the University of Chicago, getting his Ph.D. in 1978. He taught at the University of Michigan for three years and at Syracuse University from 1981 until 2005. Lewis was an AMS member since 1972.

Burnett C. Meyer (1921-2006)
Meyer passed away on March 24. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in 1949 under the direction of George Pólya. Meyer was a faculty member at the University of Colorado and an AMS member since 1947.

Gloria Olive (1923-2006)
Olive died April 17. She was a senior lecturer at the University of Otago (New Zealand) from 1972 to 1989 and was a professor and chair at Anderson College (now Anderson University) in Indiana from 1952 to 1968. Olive received her Ph.D. from Oregon State University in 1963. While at Otago she was a member of the Council of the New Zealand Mathematical Society (NZMS) and the convener of the New Zealand National Committee for Mathematics. A web page from the NZMS Newsletter has more information on her career.

Richard F. Datko (1932-2006)
Datko died on March 31 at the age of 73. He received his Ph.D. in 1963 from the University of Southern California. He taught at Los Angeles State College and McGill University before joining the faculty at Georgetown University in 1969, where he spent most of the rest of his professional career. Datko also worked as an editor at Mathematical Reviews® from 1985 to 1987.

Arnold Grudin (1916-2006)
Grudin, professor emeritus at Denison University, died March 11. Grudin taught at Denison for 34 years and subsequently taught at Pikeville College for two years. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1960. Grudin was an AMS member since 1956. A Denison University web page has more information.

George Lorentz (1910-2006)
Lorentz died on January 1. He received his doctorate from the University of Leningrad in 1936. Among his publications are the books Approximation of Functions, Bernstein Polynomials, and a collection of his works Mathematics from Leningrad to Austin. Lorentz was a member of the AMS since 1950.

Jerome P. Levine (1937-2006)
Levine had a profound influence on the subject of topology, particularly on knot theory. In 1962 he received his Ph.D. under the direction of Norman Steenrod at Princeton University and began his career as an instructor at MIT. There he began his long stream of results in higher dimensional knot theory that profoundly redefined the subject. Levine's early results in knot theory were among the first and most significant applications of the new tool of surgery theory which dominated geometric topology during the 1960s and 1970s. After a short period as an Associate Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, he moved to Brandeis University. Levine died on April 8, 2006. His influence and contributions continued throughout his career, with his latest publications still to appear in 2006. Levine was an AMS member for 47 years. Brandeis has posted a memorial web page where people can share their memories of Levine.

Thomas P. Branson (1953-2006)
Thomas P. Branson, who worked in the fields of mathematical physics, differential geometry, geometric analysis, and spectral and representation theory, passed away suddenly on March 11, 2006. Branson received his Ph.D. from MIT in 1979. After holding post-doc and teaching positions at universities in the U.S. and in Europe, he served as a Professor at the University of Iowa since 1985. Branson was an AMS member since 1979. His AMS activities include organizing a number of AMS special sessions on conformal geometry. He is widely known for his Branson-Paneitz operators and especially for his pioneering and deep work on conformal invariance and conformal symmetry. In particular, he introduced Q-curvature, and his work on the functional determinant of the conformal Laplacian on 4-manifolds is profound. A memorial service was held for him at St. Mary's Church in Iowa City. Tom Branson is survived by siblings, by his wife and his two small daughters, second and third grade. The University of Iowa Department of Mathematics has set up an education fund for the Branson daughters. The department page includes more information.

Alec L. Matheson (1946-2006)
Matheson, of Lamar University, was an active participant at many mathematics conferences. Matheson, who died on April 4, 2006, was an AMS member for 29 years.

George Mackey (1916-2006)
Mackey passed away on March 15, 2006. He worked in the fields of representation theory, group actions, functional analysis and mathematical physics. Mackey received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1942 and remained on the faculty there until his retirement in 1985. Mackey, an AMS member since 1941, gave the AMS Colloquium Lecture in 1961, and served as AMS Vice President and Council member in the mid 1960's. The Harvard University Mathematics Department History Resources web page includes photographs of Mackey, links to sources with more information about him, and an announcement for a memorial service on Saturday, April 29, 2006 at 2 p.m. at Harvard's Memorial Church.

Thyagaraju Chelluri (1977-2004)
A Chelluri Lecture Endowment was established in 2004 in memory of Chelluri, who graduated magna cum laude from Cornell with a bachelor's degree in mathematics in 1999. The following is from the Chelluri Lecture Series web page: "Raju was a brilliant student, a gifted scholar, and a wonderful human being who died on August 21, 2004 at the age of 26, shortly after completing all requirements for the Ph.D. in Mathematics at Rutgers University. He wrote a thesis called Equidistribution of the Roots of Quadratic Congruences under the supervision of H. Iwaniec. He was awarded a Ph.D. posthumously." Chelluri was an AMS member for five years.

Submissions about recent deaths, including the person's name, birth and death dates, and brief information about him or her, may be sent to paoffice@ams.org.

Back to In Memory Of ... .

American Mathematical Society