Top Ways to Use Free AMS Content

Our website offers lots of free content that can be used for informal learning and enrichment, thinking about careers, and recreation. During this time of social distancing, online teaching and home schooling, we invite you to explore our online essays, sample book chapters, Notices issues, podcasts, videos, blogs, and more, and share them with your family, friends and colleagues. Here's a tour of just some offerings by and for our wide community across all ages, with top things to do:

1. Read stories about mathematicians

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2. Listen to podcasts

  • Listen to Anna Nagurney talk about COVID-19 and its effect on supply chains.
  • Listen Up! Mathematical scientists and other researchers talk about current work in areas like "Analyzing Mako Motion," "Unmasking Deepfakes," "Screening for Autism," "Scoring with New Thinking," "Countermanding Gerrymandering," "Farming Better," "Hunting for Planets," and many more audio Mathematical Moments.

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3. Play games and puzzles

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4. Be creative

  • Hear Math and Music. The notations of composers and sounds made by musicians are connected to mathematics. Listen to performances and explanations, play an instrument or sing, or compose a piece on your own or with fellow-yet-remote musicians to share online.
  • See stunning artworks on Mathematical Imagery and try your hand at folding origami, making fractals, creating a geometric sculpture...
  • Enjoy and write Math Poetry. Read some AMS Math Poetry Contest winners and then compose your own math limerick, sonnet, or haiku.
  • Download free line-drawing and curve-stitching patterns. All you need are color pens or pencils and a ruler, or plastic needles and yarn, to make your own designs!

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5. Explore what you can do with a math degree

  • Do research and teach in academia, teach in K-12 schools, work in business, industry or government (BIG) or in nonprofits, or be an entrepreneur.
  • Talking BIG Jobs. In this series of video interviews, hear what mathematicians have to say about using biomathematics in the pharmaceutical industry, statistics at Sandia National Laboratories, and mathematics to leverage predictive models to optimize technology operation and development in industry.

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6. See what math teachers are doing

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7. Follow news about how mathematicians are helping solve real-world problems

  • See recent videos on AMS YouTube with Mac Hyman and biostatisticians Laura Forsberg White and Helen Jenkins talking about modeling COVID-19.
  • Mathematicians shedding light on the coronavirus. See Math in the Media for coverage in the news media and science magazines.
  • Each year our Office of Government Relations invites a mathematician to talk on Capitol Hill about ongoing research that's helping to solve problems.  See Congressional Briefings and Exhibitions on cryptography, modeling, nanomaterials, monitoring an electric power system, and more. Follow the Capital Currents Blog for timely information on activities in Congress that affect mathematicians and the broader science community and opportunities for engaging with Congress and other policy-makers.
  • Download free PDFs of nearly 150 Mathematical Moments mini-posters on the role math plays in science, nature, technology, and human culture.

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8. Take the challenge!

  • Match wits with past contestants to see if you can answer these questions from the AMS Math Game. Quiz yourself--and your fellow math lovers!
    • The three-digit prime number abc is written twice to make the six-digit number abc,abc. How many prime factors does abc,abc have?
    • The solution set of the equation $(xy-1)(xy)(y-x-1)=0$ separates the plane into how many regions?
    • Jordan ordered some pizzas and sandwiches. The price of each pizza was 50% more than the price of a sandwich. When the order arrived, the number of pizzas Jordan ordered and the number of sandwiches ordered had been switched, which increased the bill by 1/3. What is the ratio of the number of pizzas Jordan originally ordered to the number of sandwiches originally ordered?
    • For a positive integer n, let P(n) denote the product of the digits of n, Q(n) the sum of the squares of the digits of n, and S(n) the sum of the digits of n. For example, P(125) = 10, Q(125) = 30, and S(125) = 8. What is the sum of the two two-digit numbers M for which M = P(M) + Q(M) + S(M)?
    • In a row of five seats, five mathematicians arrive wearing integer-valued jersey numbers 1 to 5. How many ways can they be seated in the row so that no person is between two people (and sitting next to each) whose jersey numbers sum to their jersey number?
    • What is the smallest positive integer n such that 22020 is a divisor (factor) of n! ?
    • Three integers a, b, and c satisfy $$ i. \,0 \leq a \leq b \leq c, \textrm { and}$$ $$ ii.\, abc + ab + ac + bc + a + b + c =2019.$$ What is the smallest possible value of $a + b + c$?
    • See the answers. For more questions, see previous qualifying tests, and videos of previous games.

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    9. Learn about an area of math that's new to you