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Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society
ISSN 1088-9485(online) ISSN 0273-0979(print)

 

Marshall Stone and the internationalization of the American mathematical research community


Author: Karen Hunger Parshall
Journal: Bull. Amer. Math. Soc. 46 (2009), 459-482
MSC (2000): Primary 01A60, 01A70
Published electronically: March 19, 2009
MathSciNet review: 2507278
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Abstract: The American mathematical research community celebrated, symbolically at least, its fiftieth anniversary in 1938. Many of those fifty years had marked a period of consolidation and growth at home of programs in mathematics at institutions of higher education supportive of high-level research as well as of a corps of talented researchers capable of making seminal contributions in a variety of mathematical areas. By the middle decades of the twentieth century--the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s--members of that community, like members of the broader American public, began increasingly to look outward beyond the national boundaries of the United States and toward a larger international arena. This paper explores the contexts within which the American mathematical research community, in general, and the American mathematician Marshall Stone, in particular, deliberately worked in the decades around mid-century to effect the transformation from a national community to one actively participating in an internationalizing mathematical world.


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Additional Information

Karen Hunger Parshall
Affiliation: Departments of History and Mathematics, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400137, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904-4137

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1090/S0273-0979-09-01242-7
PII: S 0273-0979(09)01242-7
Received by editor(s): October 7, 2008
Published electronically: March 19, 2009
Article copyright: © Copyright 2009 American Mathematical Society
The copyright for this article reverts to public domain 28 years after publication.