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Snapshots of Mathematics in Sub-Saharan Africa

Mathematics is on the rise in Sub-Saharan Africa, where a critical mass of researchers and educators is developing. This article provides snapshots of the experiences of several mathematicians who have done research and teaching south of the Sahara.

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Prime Numbers and the Riemann Hypothesis

Donal O’Shea reviews Barry Mazur and William Stein's book whose mission it is to explain, "in a manner as direct as possible and with the least mathematical background required," the Riemann Hypothesis and why it is so important.

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2017–2018 Faculty Salaries Report

Amanda L. Golbeck, Thomas H. Barr, and Colleen A. Rose report on faculty salaries in part one of the Annual Survey of Mathematical Sciences.

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Free and Fair Open Access Journals: Flipping, Fostering, Founding

In his Opinion piece, Mark C. Wilson makes a case for free fair open access journals, obtained by flipping existing journals, fostering volunteer-based journals, or founding new journals.

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Tribute to Joe Diestel (1943–2017)

Friends of Joe Diestel offer fond remembrances of the mathematician whose influence cannot be measured simply by the theorems he proved.

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Students’ Combinatorial Reasoning: Counting Processes and Sets of Outcomes

Researcher Elise Lockwood presents a Doceamus on the central theme of her findings that students should focus on the sets of outcomes they are trying to count, not just the counting process.

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Clarence F. Stephens (1917–2018)

Johnny L. Houston pens a memorial tribute for nationally acclaimed master teacher of collegiate mathematics and creator of the Morgan Potsdam Model Clarence F. Stephens.

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Letter to the Editor

We invite readers to submit letters to the editor to Notices at notices-letters@ams.org

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Hans F. Weinberger (1928–2017)

Mathematicians and family alike remember Hans Felix Weinberger who once described how he became a mathematician by explaining, “I was a physics major, but I kept breaking things."

Einstein's Italian Mathematicians
 
American Mathematical Society