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David P. Robbins Prize

David P. RobbinsThe Robbins Prize is for a paper with the following characteristics:  it shall report on novel research in algebra, combinatorics or discrete mathematics and shall have a significant experimental component; and it shall be on a topic which is broadly accessible and shall provide a simple statement of the problem and clear exposition of the work. Papers published within the six calendar years preceding the year in which the prize is awarded are eligible for consideration.

Prize Details
The US$5,000 prize is awarded every three years.

Next Prize
January 2016

Nomination Procedure
Nominations with supporting information should be submitted through this online form: Include a short description of the work that is the basis of the nomination, including complete bibliographic citations. A curriculum vitae should be included. Those who prefer to submit by regular mail may send nominations to the AMS Secretary, Professor Carla Savage, Box 8206, Computer Science Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27695-8206. Those nominations will be forwarded by the Secretary to the prize selection committee.

Most Recent Prize: 2013
Alexander Razborov, of The University of Chicago, was awarded the 2013 Robbins Prize for his paper “On the minimal density of triangles in graphs” (Combinatorics, Probability and Computing 17 (2008), no. 4, 603–618), and for introducing a new powerful method, flag algebras, to solve problems in extremal combinatorics.

About this Prize
This prize was established in 2005 in memory of David P. Robbins by members of his family.  Robbins, who died in 2003, received his Ph.D. in 1970 from MIT.  He was a long-time member of the Institute for Defense Analysis Center for Communications Research and a prolific mathematician whose work (much of it classified) was in discrete mathematics. 

See previous prizes

Photo courtesy of Ken Robbins.

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